does it have an impact on the capacity of the batteries?


Net of brute power, aesthetics and photographic sectors, the fast charging it is one of the features that most differentiates the various smartphones from each other. In recent years, the world of Android smartphones has been hit by a real race to reach the faster charging speed; the first models are starting to arrive with charging at 150 W but there are already technologies capable of pushing themselves over 200 W.

Thanks to a study conducted by the portal GSMarenawe become aware of many details on the influence of the charging speed on the capacity of the batteries and we can sum up on the subject.

Fast Charging: Does it have an impact on battery capacity?

GSMarena conducted a relative study on a fair number of Android smartphones, comparing smartphones as similar as possible and presented in the same period but proposed, between rebrands and not, with different battery packs and fast charging technology.

The smartphones under study come from the Xiaomi world (and related brands) and from the OPPO world (and related brands), two manufacturers who have pushed hard on the accelerator pedal with regard to fast charging.

We are more and more used, especially in the medium-low range, to witness the presentation of a huge number of smartphones, almost identical, but with slightly different names (true Xiaomi?): Often, the only difference between two such products is limited. just to the battery capacity and the charging speed.

The question behind the study is: How much does fast charging cost in terms of battery capacity? Small spoiler: higher charging speed means less capacious battery, approximately 10% on average. This suggests that a smartphone from 5000 mAhwould have a counterpart with faster charging but battery from 4500 mAh.

To obtain this answer, the study examined twelve pairs of devices (some of which are not present on the Italian market), comparing, among the various pairs, the battery capacity and the charging speed, in order to calculate the “cost” of the increased speed. Below we report the data found.

  • Redmi Note 11 Pro (China) and Xiaomi 11i HyperCharge 5G
    • Battery capacity: 5160 mAh against 4500 mAh
    • Charging speed: 67 W against 120 W
    • Difference: -15%
  • Xiaomi 11i and Xiaomi 11i HyperCharge 5G
    • Battery capacity: 5160 mAh against 4500 mAh
    • Charging speed: 67 W against 120 W
    • Difference: -15%
  • Vivo Y72 5G and iQOO Z3
    • Battery capacity: 5000 mAh against 4400 mAh
    • Charging speed: 18 W against 55 W
    • Difference: -14%
  • Realme 7 (Global) and Realme Narzo 20 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 5000 mAh against 4500 mAh
    • Charging speed: 30 W against 65 W
    • Difference: -11%
  • iQOO Z5 and iQOO Neo5 SE
    • Battery capacity: 5000 mAh against 4500 mAh
    • Charging speed: 44 W against 55 W
    • Difference: -11%
  • Redmi K50 and Redmi K50 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 5500 mAh against 5000 mAh
    • Charging speed: 67 W against 120 W
    • Difference: -10%
  • Xiaomi Mi 10 5G and Xiaomi Mi 10 Pro 5G
    • Battery capacity: 4780 mAh against 4500 mAh
    • Charging speed: 30 W against 50 W
    • Difference: -6%
  • Xiaomi Pad 5 and Xiaomi Pad 5 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 8720 mAh against 8600 mAh
    • Charging speed: 33 W against 67 W
    • Difference: -1%
  • Redmi Note 9 Pro (India) and POCO M2 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 5020 mAh against 5000 mAh
    • Charging speed: 18 W against 33 W
    • Difference: 0%
  • Redmi Note 9 Pro (India) and Redmi Note 9 Pro (Global)
    • Battery capacity: 5020 mAh against 5020 mAh
    • Charging speed: 18 W against 30 W
    • Difference: 0%
  • OPPO A93 and OPPO F17 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 4000 mAh against 4015 mAh
    • Charging speed: 18 W against 30 W
    • Difference: 0%
  • OPPO Reno4 F and OPPO F17 Pro
    • Battery capacity: 4000 mAh against 4015 mAh
    • Charging speed: 18 W against 30 W
    • Difference: 0%

It is clear that the difference varies from comparison to comparison but, in general, a faster charging speed means a battery with a reduced capacity. It should also be emphasized that from the comparison carried out on two Android tablets (Xiaomi Pad 5 and Pad 5 Pro) it emerges that on larger batteries, a higher charging speed has a minor impact (about 1%).

Two completely opposite philosophies

Another interesting aspect can be extrapolated from the comparisons: smartphones that have lower charging powers are forced to give up less capacity.

A striking example of this is given by the comparison between the two Redmi Note 9 Pro, in the India version and in the Global version: the two smartphones have the same battery despite having a difference, albeit slightly marked, between the fast charging technologies (18 W against 30 W).

On the contrary, instead, smartphones with exaggerated charging speeds: comparing Xiaomi 11i and Xiaomi 11i Hypercharge, there is a 15% difference between the battery capacities of the two smartphones; in this case, the charging speed changes from 67 W to 120 W and the capacity is reduced by 5160 mAh to the 4500 mAh.

Therefore, GSMarena has divided the two smartphones into two categories that reflect these two completely opposite philosophies: the category within the 30 Wmaximum limit before starting to pay the best performing fast charge in terms of battery capacity, and category over 100 Wwith smartphones suitable for “emergency charging”.

Compromise choice or clear ideas?

We arrive at an almost compromise choice. Having the ability to recharge at a faster rate allows you to be able to recharge a smartphone in less time. Having a larger battery allows you to recharge a smartphone fewer times, thanks to that (albeit little) more autonomy.

With the same time available, it is clear that smartphones with the ultra-fast charging offer the advantage ofimmediacy: during the time of a shower, for example, the smartphone with the most powerful fast charging will charge at a higher percentage.

So this aspect, or this compromise choice, could translate into a simple preference, dictated by the habits of each of us: users who charge their smartphone every night, without haste, could very well consider it almost useless ultra-fast charging. Users who quickly drain their battery and don’t have the slightest intention of running with a power bank, on the other hand, will find this technology to be fundamental.

However, it should be emphasized that the charging speed will not be constant throughout the procedure: the tendency is to start with extreme speeds when the remaining range is close to 0% and then slow down as it increases.

In the middle of the phones from 30 W and to those from over 100 W those from 60 W: nothing exaggerated, nothing extreme, maybe they are the right compromise. Manufacturers, however, are increasingly implementing algorithms for safeguard battery health through optimized charging operations.

What do you think? Better a smartphone that recharges faster or a smartphone with greater autonomy? Let us know, with a comment, which side you are on!

You may also be interested in: Redmi Note 11 Pro 5G review: renewed but does not leave its mark

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